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Researchers develop RFID-enabled 'smart' paper



Published May 7, 2013
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Researchers North Dakota State University have developed a process called Laser Enabled Advanced Packaging (LEAP), a method of embedding RFID chips in paper. The technique has potential for preventing anti-counterfeiting. In this process, lasers are used to transfer as well as assemble the chips on the paper. The paper would thus be called a "smart paper," which in turn can be used for various purposes such as smart labels, banknotes, tickets and legal documents.

The ultra-thin, ultra-small RFID chips used in the LEAP process can be embedded in paper or other flexible substrates. As such, they could lead to ways to reduce counterfeiting of a wide variety of items such as pharmaceuticals, currency, legal papers, bearer bonds and other security documents. The method could enable the production of paper-based RFID tags at a cost lower than that of today's conventional RFID tags and at packaging rates multiple times higher than those attainable with the conventional pick-and-place technology.

Val Marinov, the head of the project at North Dakota State, says the process is twice as fast as that current method of manufacturing RFID-enabled paper. It is also cheaper because of less material used. Marinov adds that the European bank and Bank of Japan have hinted towards their intention for development of this technology, but they did not go for it. Therefore, the technology developed by the North Dakota State research team is the first one which demonstrates the functional RFID tag embedded in paper.

The team that developed the technology is now looking for commercial partners. The research findings were recently presented at an RFID conference in Florida.

r. Val Marinov's team has developed a method to embed ultra-thin, ultra-small RFID chips on paper or other , which could lead to ways to reduce counterfeiting of a wide variety of items such as pharmaceuticals, currency, legal papers, bearer bonds and other security documents. The patent-pending process, known as Laser Enabled Advanced Packaging, uses a 's energy to precisely transfer and assemble chips with dimensions well below those possible using conventional methods.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-05-smart-paper-antennaless-rfid-tags.html#jCpr. Val Marinov's team has developed a method to embed ultra-thin, ultra-small RFID chips on paper or other flexible substrates, which could lead to ways to reduce counterfeiting of a wide variety of items such as pharmaceuticals, currency, legal papers, bearer bonds and other security documents. The patent-pending process, known as Laser Enabled Advanced Packaging, uses a laser beam's energy to precisely transfer and assemble chips with dimensions well below those possible using conventional methods.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-05-smart-paper-antennaless-rfid-tags.html#jCp


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