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Comexi unveils new CI flexo press

June 21, 2010

The new press, which is aimed at high efficiency, utilizes electron beam curing technology.

Comexi Group has lifted the wraps on its newest press, the F4FLEXOEfficiency central impression press, developed as part of a program for a new concept of central drum flexo presses aimed at high efficiency.

Company officials say that the new press technology addresses the short run needs of traditional converters, as well as the needs of label manufacturers who desire productivity improvements and the elimination of photoinitiators. The new Comexi press utilizes electron beam curing technology, which does not require the use of photoinitiators as in UV curable inks.

The eight-color F4 FLEXOEfficiency press features a new doctor blade chamber support design that reduces changeover times and increases accessibility; a design that simplifies maintenance and changeovers; and a width of 670mm/26.3’’ (up to 870mm/34.2’’) with minimum repeat of 240mm/9.4’’ (up to a maximum repeat of 600mm/23.6’’). The maximum speed is 300 mpm/984 fpm.

Founded in 1954 and headquartered in Riudellots de la Selva, Spain, Comexi Group is a family-run company that manufactures flexo presses, solvent and solventless lamination and coating systems, slitting and rewinding equipment, and logistics and environmental management products. The company employs more than 400 people at its factories in Spain and in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.



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